Fifteen more bids approved for safety building

Princeton city officials, safety building committee members and contractors conducted a groundbreaking Thursday, May 23 near the future entrance of the city’s new public safety building south of First Street and north of the airport at 21st Avenue. From left are councilmember Victoria Hallin, contractor Troy Thompson, firefighters Jason Baumunk and Tim Jensen, contractor Jeff Hensel, police Sgt. Joe Backlund, police Investigator Todd Frederick, Mayor Paul Whitcomb, councilmember Dick Dobson, Fire Chief Jim Roxbury, councilmember Thom Walker, City Administrator Mark Karnowski, site superintendent Howard Pederson and project manager Rob Gemelke.

Princeton city officials, safety building committee members and contractors conducted a groundbreaking Thursday, May 23 near the future entrance of the city’s new public safety building south of First Street and north of the airport at 21st Avenue. From left are councilmember Victoria Hallin, contractor Troy Thompson, firefighters Jason Baumunk and Tim Jensen, contractor Jeff Hensel, police Sgt. Joe Backlund, police Investigator Todd Frederick, Mayor Paul Whitcomb, councilmember Dick Dobson, Fire Chief Jim Roxbury, councilmember Thom Walker, City Administrator Mark Karnowski, site superintendent Howard Pederson and project manager Rob Gemelke.

The city has awarded 15 additional contract bids for the construction of a Princeton public safety building this year that will house the Princeton Fire and Police departments, which have outgrown their quarters.
The council had hoped to keep the cost of the new building down to not much more than $2 million, but it went over to come out at $2,177,544. The biggest single extra cost was a fifth parking bay for the Fire Department. It is listed as an alternative bid of $54,323 and was not in the base plan. Fire Chief Jim Roxbury had argued to the council that the department would end up asking the city for money later to build a stand-alone garage if the extra bay were not included.
The department needs a heated space for storing the equipment it would have to use in case there were an evacuation from Monticello due to a catastrophic event at the Monticello nuclear reactor. Princeton is designated as a relocation center to check the evacuees for radiation and do any needed decontamination of people, vehicles and pets.
The City Council approved the latest 15 contract bids for the approximately 23,000-square-foot safety building last Thursday, as recommended by Greystone Construction, Shakopee, the construction manager.
The 15 bids with alternates comes out to $564,271.
The painting contract went to a local company. Steinbrecher Painting, Princeton, got the award for a base bid of $19,600 plus alternate of $850.
Great Northern Landscapes, Elk River, was awarded the landscaping bid for $22,000.
Target completion is this coming fall.
The city is counting on revenue from its off-sale liquor store to repay the money that the city will borrow to construct and equip the building. The fire department also has $130,000 in a fund that was built up for the construction of a new building.

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